1. Smart and Inclusive Growth - Overview

COST is an intergovernmental framework for European Cooperation in Science and Technology, allowing the coordination of nationally-funded research on a European level.

COST is ready to take on the challenges that lay ahead in Horizon 2020. COST’s mission is to enable break-through scientific developments leading to new concepts and products, and thereby contribute to strengthening Europe’s research and innovation capacities. As part of this mission, COST will continue to foster scientific and technological excellence and inclusiveness in Europe, by supporting bottom-up, open science and technology networks involving researchers across the continent. In order to do so, COST has been formally inscribed in Horizon 2020 and is expected to contribute in particular to the ‘Societal Challenges’ and ‘Spreading Excellence and Widening Participation’ pillars of the Horizon 2020 strategy.   

Horizon 2020 has been allocated a budget of almost €80 billion, amounting to a 30% increase from the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). In this context, COST will receive an increased budget compared to the budget allocated under FP7. This increase confirms the strategic importance of COST as a unique intergovernmental framework in the context of the ERA, enabling scientists and researchers to jointly develop their own ideas and new initiatives through inclusive, trans-European cooperation in science and technology and networking. 

COST’s preparation for the new seven-year period required the establishment of a new legal entity, the ‘COST Association’. The COST Association will incorporate COST’s governance and administrative functions into a single, integrated structure. All 35 COST Member Countries are expected to adhere to and support this new dedicated agency, thus taking full responsibility for the implementation of COST as an intergovernmental networking framework programme. COST’s current implementing agent, the European Science Foundation (ESF), will ensure that COST activities continue to be implemented until the EC-ESF COST II FP7 Grant Agreement is fully executed and all activities are definitively transferred to the COST Association. COST and the ESF are jointly committed to ensuring a smooth transition so as to avoid any disruption of activities, to the best benefit of the European science and technology community.

COST is a building block of the European Research Area, instrumental for successful innovation strategies and global cooperation.
 

Objectives

COST Mission Statement

COST enables breakthrough scientific developments leading to new concepts and products and thereby contributes to strengthen Europe’s research and innovation capacities.

 

COST key features are:

Building capacity by connecting high-quality scientific communities throughout Europe and worldwide;  Providing networking opportunities for early career investigators;

Increasing the impact of research on policy makers, regulatory bodies and national decision makers as well as the private sector.

2. Sustainable Growth: Natural Resources. Overview

The Commission has proposed an overall ceiling of €1 082 555 million under five headings:

1. Smart and inclusive growth: 47%
2. Sustainable growth: natural resources: 39%
3. Security and citizenship: 2%
4. Global Europe: 6%
5. Administration: 6%

Outside MFF there are (to complete 100%):

- Emergency Aid Researve

- European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF)

- European Union Solidarity Fund

- Flexibility Instrument

- European Development Fund (EDF)

3. Security and citizenship. Overview

The Commission has proposed an overall ceiling of €1 082 555 million under five headings:

1. Smart and inclusive growth: 47%
2. Sustainable growth: natural resources: 39%
3. Security and citizenship: 2%
4. Global Europe: 6%
5. Administration: 6%

Outside MFF there are (to complete 100%):

- Emergency Aid Researve

- European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF)

- European Union Solidarity Fund

- Flexibility Instrument

- European Development Fund (EDF)

4. Global Europe. Overview

The Commission has proposed an overall ceiling of €1 082 555 million under five headings:

1. Smart and inclusive growth: 47%
2. Sustainable growth: natural resources: 39%
3. Security and citizenship: 2%
4. Global Europe: 6%
5. Administration: 6%

Outside MFF there are (to complete 100%):

- Emergency Aid Researve

- European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF)

- European Union Solidarity Fund

- Flexibility Instrument

- European Development Fund (EDF)

Agriculture. The Common Agricultural Policy

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is designed to deliver a modern, sustainable and efficient agricultural sector in Europe. It aims to promote the competitiveness of the sector, to ensure an adequate and secure food supply and to preserve the environment and countryside while providing a fair standard of living for the agricultural community.

The new CAP maintains the two pillars, but increases the links between them, thus offering a more holistic and integrated approach to policy support. Specifically it introduces a new architecture of direct payments; better targeted, more equitable and greener, an enhanced safety net and strengthened rural development.

The CAP is financed by two funds, which form part of the EU's general budget:

  • the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) finances direct payments to farmers and measures to respond to market disturbances, such as private or publiuc storage and export refunds, while
  • the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) finances the rural development programmes of the Member States.

The CAP is a genuinely European policy. Instead of operating 28 separate agriculture policies and budgets, Member States pool resources to operate a single European policy with a single European budget. This naturally means that the CAP accounts for a significant proportion of the EU budget.

The recent political agreement on CAP relates to four basic European Parliament and Council regulations  – i) on Direct Payments, ii) the Single Common Market Organisation (CMO), iii) Rural Development and, iv) a Horizontal Regulation for financing, managing and monitoring the CAP.

CAP reform objectives:

  • Enhanced competitiveness of EU agriculture
  • Improved sustainability
  • Greater effectiveness through more targeted and equitable direct payments

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is designed to deliver a modern, sustainable and efficient agricultural sector in Europe. It aims to promote the competitiveness of the sector, to ensure an adequate and secure food supply and to preserve the environment and countryside while providing a fair standard of living for the agricultural community.

 

The CAP is a genuinely European policy. Instead of operating 27 separate agriculture policies and budgets, Member States pool resources to operate a single European policy with a single European budget. This naturally means that the CAP accounts for a significant proportion of the EU budget.

 

The reformed CAP will promote smart, sustainable and inclusive growth by promoting resource efficiency in order to maintain the production base for food, feed and renewable energy across the whole EU; incentivising actions to mitigate and adapt to climate change, to protect ecosystems and fight biodiversity loss; and supporting diversification of economic activity in rural areas so as to promote balanced territorial development throughout Europe.

Ambient Assisted Living Joint Programme

The AAL JP is a funding activity that aims to create better condition of life for the older adults and to strengthen the industrial opportunities in Europe through the use of information and communication technology (ICT). It carries out its mandate through the funding of across-national projects (at least three countries involved) that involves small and medium enterprises (SME), research bodies and user’s organizations (representing the older adults)

Main goals of renewed programme:

  • To give older adults access to more and better products and services for ageing well. These will help them to keep living independently in their own homes and to participate in economy and society for more years.
  • To create a larger market for industry and especially SMEs at European level and improve EU competitiveness in ICT based products and services for ageing well.
  • To make researchers benefit from collaboration with other experts at European scale.
  • To help governments gain cost efficiencies and increased sustainability of health and social care, while tackling the societal challenge of demographic ageing.

Article 185 Initiatives*

Article 185 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU)

[ex Article 169 of the Treaty establishing the European Community (TEC)] enables the EU to participate in research programmes undertaken jointly by several Member States, including participation in the structures created for the execution of national programmes.

Article 185 (ex-Art. 169) remains equal in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), nevertheless there are some changes for Horizon 2020 compared to the 7th Framework Programme for Art. 185:

 

  1. In the Commission proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing Horizon 2020 - The Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (2014-2020), adopted on 30th November 2011, Article 20 spells out the needed three integration levels for using the instrument of Art. 185 . Under the 7th Framework Programme this was not explicit.
  2. In the Commission Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and Council laying down the rules for the participation and dissemination in Horizon 2020, ), adopted on 30th November 2011, Article 1 states that the Rules for Participation of the FP will apply to Art. 185 initiatives (with the possibility for justified derogations). Since the start of Art. 185 initiatives under the 6th Framework Programme and under the 7th Framework Programme, Art. 185 was exempt from the Rules for Participation.

 

Subsequently any new proposal for an Art. 185 initiative, apart from the existing criteria (in the Horizon 2020 proposal they are listed in Art.20) will have to take into account these two additional requirements.

On 10 July 2013 the Commission adopted the Innovation Investment Package which, besides proposals for Art. 187 initiatives (PPPs), also consisted of four proposals for Art. 185 initiatives (P2Ps). The budget in the Commission Proposal of these four Public-to-Public Partnerships amounts to a total public budget of almost 3,5 billion € (Horizon 2020 and participating states funds combined). Currently, the ordinary legislative procedure (with Council and European Parliament) is ongoing.

These four Art. 185 initiatives are the successor initiatives to the currently existing Art. 185 initiatives under FP 6 and FP 7:

Objectives

The actions supported may cover subjects not directly linked to the ten themes of the FP7/H2020 'Cooperation' Specific Programme, in as far as they have a sufficient EU added value. They will also be used to enhance the complementarity and synergy between FP7/H2020 and activities carried out under intergovernmental structures such as EUREKA and COST.

Asylum and Migration Fund

The general objective of the Fund shall be to contribute to an effective management of migration flows in the Union as part of the area of freedom, security and justice, in accordance with the common policy on asylum, subsidiary protection and temporary protection and the common immigration policy. It draws on the capacity building process developed with the assistance of the European Refugee Fund, the European Fund for the Integration of third-country nationals and the European Return Fund and extends it to cover more comprehensively different aspects of the common Union asylum and immigration policy, including actions in or in relation to third countries addressing primarily EU interests and objectives in those policy areas, and takes into account new developments.

 

  • to strengthen and develop the Common European Asylum System, including its external dimension;
  • to support legal migration to the Union in line with the economic and social needs of Member States and promote the effective integration of third-country nationals, including of asylum seekers and beneficiaries of international protection;
  • to enhance fair and effective return strategies in the Member States with emphasis on sustainability of return and effective readmission in the countries of origin;
  • to enhance the solidarity and responsibility sharing between the Member States, in particular towards those most affected by migration and asylum flows.

BONUS

BONUS - 'Joint Baltic Sea Research Programme

BONUS brings together the research communities of marine, maritime, economical and societal research to address the major challenges faced by the Baltic Sea region. A full understanding of the Baltic Sea system is needed. This requires sound knowledge that is scientifically first-rate and relevant for society.

 

The overarching objective of BONUS-169 is to integrate the Baltic Sea System research into a durable cooperative, interdisciplinary, well integrated and focused multinational programme to support the region’s sustainable development. It will enhance our understanding and predictive capacity about the Baltic Sea System’s response to impending changes caused by both natural and human-induced pressures and about linkages between environmental problems and the social and economic dynamics in responding to them. In turn, it will form the basis for prudent management aimed at safeguarding the sustainable use of the ecosystem’s goods and services.

The BONUS 'Joint Baltic Sea Research Programme' is fully aligned with the objectives of the European Strategy for Marine and Maritime Research. It is an integral part of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea which seeks to provide both a co-ordinated, and inclusive framework in response to the key challenges facing the Baltic Sea Region, together with concrete solutions for these challenges. By implementing a policy-driven, fully-integrated joint research programme, based on extensive and on-going stakeholder consultations, BONUS will provide concrete scientific outputs facilitating the implementation of ecosystem-based management of environmental issues in the Baltic Sea. BONUS thereby supports sustainable development in the region while strengthening research collaboration and facilitating the use of common resources and infrastructure in the region.


Objectives
 

The strategic objectives of BONUS (2010-2016) are:

 

  • Understanding the Baltic Sea ecosystem structure and functioning
  • Meeting the multifaceted challenges in linking the Baltic Sea with its coast and catchment
  • Enhancing sustainable use of coastal and marine goods and services of the Baltic Sea
  • Improving the capabilities of the society to respond to the current and future challenges directed to the Baltic Sea region
  • Developing improved and innovative observation and data management systems, tools and methodologies for marine information needs in the Baltic Sea region enhancing sustainable use of coastal and marine goods and services of the Baltic Sea

 

The scientific approach towards the above strategic objectives is interdisciplinary with a balanced representation natural and socioeconomic disciplines.

 

Cohesion Fund (CF)

The Cohesion Fund is a structural instrument designed to support the least prosperous Member States* to help catch-up with other Member States and to stabilize their economies while supporting sustainable development (actions in the frame of the Convergence objective). It finances major projects in the fields of transport, energy and environmental protection.

The Cohesion Fund contributes to interventions in the field of the environment and trans-European transport networks. It applies to Member States with a Gross National Income (GNI) of less than 90% of the Community average which means it covers the new Member States as well as Greece and Portugal. Spain will be eligible to the Cohesion Fund on a transitional basis. In the new period, the Fund will contribute alongside the ERDF to multi-annual investment programmes managed in a decentralised way, rather than being subject to individual project approval by the Commission

Connecting Europe Facility

The Connecting Europe Facility shall enable the preparation and implementation of projects of Common interest within the framework of the trans-European networks (TEN) policy in the sectors of energy, transport and telecommunications. In particular the Connecting Europe Facility shall support the implementation of projects aiming at the development and construction of new or upgrading of existing infrastructure in the field of transport, energy and telecommunications.

 

  • Contribute to smart, sustainable and inclusive growth by developing modern and high performing trans-European networks, thus bringing forward benefits for the entire European Union in terms of competitiveness and economic, social and territorial cohesion within the Single Market and creating an environment more conducive to private and public investment through a combination of financial instruments and Union direct support and by exploiting synergies across the sectors. The achievement of this objective will be measured by the volume of public and private investment in projects of common interest, and in particular the volume of public and private investments in projects of common interest realised through the financial instruments under this Regulation.
  • Enable the Union to achieve its targets of a 20% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, a 20% increase in energy efficiency and raising the share of renewable energy to 20% up to 2020, while ensuring greater solidarity among Member States.

Consumer Programme

The aim of the Programme is to support the policy objective of placing the empowered consumer at the centre of the internal market. The Programme will do so by contributing to protecting the health, safety and economic interests of consumers, as well as to promoting their right to information, education and to organise themselves in order to safeguard their interests.
The programme will:

  • Ensure a high level of consumer protection (through better representation of consumer interests)
  • Ensure the effective application of consumer policy rules (through enforcement cooperation, information, redress and education)
  • Develop cooperation with international partners to deal with the impact of the globalisation of the production chain on product safety;
  • Support the production of EU-level comparable consumer markets data for benchmarking between Member States and input into EU-level policy-making;
  • Ensure EU-level representation of consumer interests by financially supporting EU-level consumer organisations;
  • Support awareness-raising campaigns on consumer issues and the training of national consumer organisations.

The programme has four priorities: Safety, Information and education, Rights and redress, and Enforcement (SIRE).

  • Safety: to consolidate and enhance product Safety through effective market surveillance throughout the EU;
  • Information and education: to improve consumers' education, information and awareness of their rights, to develop the evidence base for consumer policy and to provide support to consumer organisations.
  • Rights and redress: to consolidate consumer rights in particular through regulatory action and improving access to redress including alternative dispute resolution.
  • Enforcement: to support enforcement of consumer rights by strengthening cooperation between national enforcement bodies and by supporting consumers with advice.

The Consumer Programme will support EU consumer policy in the years to come, contributing to the objective of placing consumers at the centre of the Single Market. The key principle is to empower consumers to participate actively in the market and make it work for them in a way which protects their safety and economic rights and interests, in particular by:

  • Reinforcing and enhancing product safety through effective market surveillance;

  • Improving consumers' informationeducation and awareness of their rights, working closely in partnership with Member States;

  • Consolidating consumer rights and strengthening effective redress, especially through alternative dispute resolution mechanisms;

  • Strengthening enforcement cross-border by enhancing co-operation between national enforcement bodies and by supporting consumers with advice.

COSME

The programme for the Competitiveness of enterprises and SMEs (COSME)’s aim is to strengthen the competitiveness and sustainability of the Union’s enterprises, including in the tourism sector, encourage an entrepreneurial culture, and promote the creation and growth of SMEs.

It largely continues the activities started under the current Competitiveness and Innovation programme (CIP) and also ensures continuity with initiatives and actions already undertaken under the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Programme (EIP), such as the Enterprise Europe Network.

The main objective of the COSME programme is to support the competitiveness, growth and sustainability of EU's enterprises, in particular SMEs, and promoting entrepreneurship. In order to achieve this, the programme:

  • Eases SME's access to finance;
  • Facilitates access to new markets inside and outside the EU;
  • Creates better framework conditions for competitiveness;
  • Encourages Entrepreneurship.

COST*

COST is an intergovernmental framework for European Cooperation in Science and Technology, allowing the coordination of nationally-funded research on a European level.

COST is ready to take on the challenges that lay ahead in Horizon 2020. COST’s mission is to enable break-through scientific developments leading to new concepts and products, and thereby contribute to strengthening Europe’s research and innovation capacities. As part of this mission, COST will continue to foster scientific and technological excellence and inclusiveness in Europe, by supporting bottom-up, open science and technology networks involving researchers across the continent. In order to do so, COST has been formally inscribed in Horizon 2020 and is expected to contribute in particular to the ‘Societal Challenges’ and ‘Spreading Excellence and Widening Participation’ pillars of the Horizon 2020 strategy.   

Horizon 2020 has been allocated a budget of almost €80 billion, amounting to a 30% increase from the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). In this context, COST will receive an increased budget compared to the budget allocated under FP7. This increase confirms the strategic importance of COST as a unique intergovernmental framework in the context of the ERA, enabling scientists and researchers to jointly develop their own ideas and new initiatives through inclusive, trans-European cooperation in science and technology and networking. 

COST’s preparation for the new seven-year period required the establishment of a new legal entity, the ‘COST Association’. The COST Association will incorporate COST’s governance and administrative functions into a single, integrated structure. All 35 COST Member Countries are expected to adhere to and support this new dedicated agency, thus taking full responsibility for the implementation of COST as an intergovernmental networking framework programme. COST’s current implementing agent, the European Science Foundation (ESF), will ensure that COST activities continue to be implemented until the EC-ESF COST II FP7 Grant Agreement is fully executed and all activities are definitively transferred to the COST Association. COST and the ESF are jointly committed to ensuring a smooth transition so as to avoid any disruption of activities, to the best benefit of the European science and technology community.

COST is a building block of the European Research Area, instrumental for successful innovation strategies and global cooperation.
 

Objectives

COST Mission Statement

COST enables breakthrough scientific developments leading to new concepts and products and thereby contributes to strengthen Europe’s research and innovation capacities.

 

COST key features are:

Building capacity by connecting high-quality scientific communities throughout Europe and worldwide;  Providing networking opportunities for early career investigators;

Increasing the impact of research on policy makers, regulatory bodies and national decision makers as well as the private sector.

Creative Europe

Creative Europe is the European Commission's framework programme for support to the culture and audiovisual sectors.

Following on from the previous Culture Programme and MEDIA programme , Creative Europe, with a budget of €1.46 billion (9% higher than its predecessors), will support:

The programme consists of two sub-programmes; the Culture sub-programme to promote the culture sector, and the MEDIA sub-programme to support the audiovisual sector.

 

 

Customs 2020, Fiscalis 2020

Customs 2020 Programme and Fiscalis 2020 Programme

 

The Customs 2020 and Fiscalis 2020 programmes support cooperation between EU countries' customs and tax authorities. The programmes promote networking, knowledge-sharing and fund a highly secured communication network connecting national customs and tax administrations.

  • Customs 2020 will support cooperation between customs authorities in the EU to help maximise their efficiency and avoid mismatches in their work, which could hinder the functioning of the Customs Union.
  • It will facilitate networking, joint actions and training amongst customs personnel, while also funding IT systems to enable the development of  a fully fledged electronic customs in Europe.

Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI)

The Development Cooperation Instrument increases the effectiveness of the EU development cooperation by merging the previous numerous geographic and thematic mechanisms into a single instrument. It assists developing countries on their way to reducing poverty and enhancing sustainable development and social progress towards faster integration into the world economy.

Objectives and general principles of the DCI have been formulated in line with the changed EU Treaties and the latest policies. Human rights, democracy and good governance have been given increased importance. The approach of differentiation reflects needs, capacities and performance of partner countries, and targets EU development cooperation where it can have most impact: Least Developed Countries are the key priority. The DCI encourages greater concentration on certain sectors in partner countries to ensure that the EU's policy and the policies of the Member States complement each other in all areas of intervention.

Thematic programmes are concentrated and simplified by reducing them to just two: (1) 'Global public goods and challenges' and (2) 'Civil society organisations and local authorities'. The DCI will also include a new Pan-African programme in line with the Joint Africa-Europe Strategy. This programme complements other financial instruments which are applied in Africa (in particular ENI and EDF) and will support activities of trans-regional, continental and global nature in Africa and also specific initiatives for which no alternative source of funding can be mobilised.

Accompanying measures for former Sugar Protocol countries and major Banana producing countries will not be continued. These had been introduced to support the economic transition following tariff changes in the trade of these commodities with the EU;

The EU will improve its coordination in countries or regions for which a joint framework  exists that lays down a comprehensive Union strategy, including development policy. Where EU and Member States agree on joint multiannual programming, no further strategy papesr will be required. Joint programming will allow reinforced donor coordination and division of labour.

The DCI will offer new flexibility for a faster decision-making, particularly in cases of crisis, post-crisis and fragility, e.g. through the use of unallocated funds and a review of the programming.

Programming can be simplified replacing Country Strategy Papers with other existing strategy documents and alignment with national planning cycles of developing countries.

It consists of three categories of programmes: geographic programmes covering cooperation with Asia, Central Asia, Middle East, Latin America, and South Africa; thematic programmes to address global public goods and challenges and support civil society organisations and local authorities; and a new Pan-African programme to support the implementation of Joint Africa-Europe Strategy.


 

 

Emergency Aid Reserve

The Emergency Aid Reserve is designed to finance humanitarian, civilian crisis management and protection operations in non-EU countries in order to quickly respond to unforeseen events. For example, the Emergency Aid Reserve was mobilised in 2012 following the outbreak of conflict in Syria, the conflicts in Mali and the drought in the Sahel.

 

 

Employment and Social innovation Programme (EaSi)

The European Union Programme for Employment and Social Innovation promotes a high level of quality and sustainable employment, guaranteeing adequate and decent social protection, combating social exclusion and poverty and improving working conditions. It supports Member States efforts in the design and implementation of employment and social reforms at European, national as well as regional and local levels by means of policy coordination, theidentification, analysis and sharing of best practices.

 

Together with the European Social Fund, the Fund for the European Aid for the most Deprived and the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund, EaSI forms the fourth pillar of the EU Initiative for Employment and Social Inclusion 2014-2020.

 

Since January 2014, these programmes form the three axes of EaSI. They support:

  • The modernisation of employment and social policies with the PROGRESS axis (61% of the total budget);
  • Job mobility with the EURES axis (18% of the total budget);
  • Access to micro-finance and social entrepreneurship with the Microfinance and Social Entrepreneurship axis (21% of the total budget).

 

OBJECTIVES:

  • Srengthen ownership of EU objectives and coordination of action at EU and national level in the areas of employment, social affairs and inclusion.
  • Support the development of adequate social protection systems and labour market policies.
  • Modernise EU legislation and ensure its effective application.
  • Promote geographical mobility and boost employment opportunities by developing an open labour market.
  • Increase the availability and accessibility of microfinance for vulnerable groups and micro-enterprises, and increase access to finance for social enterprises.

ERA-NET*

ERA-NET (European Research Area)

The ERA-NET instrument under Horizon 2020 is designed to support public-public partnerships in their preparation, establishment of networking structures, design, implementation and coordination of joint activities as well as topping up of single joint calls and of actions of a transnational nature.

The ERA-NET under Horizon 2020 merges the former ERA-NET and ERA-NET Plus into a single instrument with the central and compulsory element of implementing one substantial call with top-up funding from the Commission. The focus of ERA-NETs is therefore shifting from the funding of networks to the top-up funding of single joint calls for transnational research and innovation in selected areas with high European added value and relevance for Horizon 2020. This aims at increasing substantially the share of funding that Member States dedicate jointly to challenge driven research and innovation agendas. Financial contributions of Member States can be in cash or in kind in order to broaden the scope of ERA-NETs towards the coordination institutional funding of governmental research organisations.

ERA-NETs under Horizon 2020 will be implemented by using a specific, new type of action: ERA-NET Cofund. There are a number of important changes compared to FP7.


Objectives

Objectives for the ERA-NET instrument under Horizon 2020

 

  • Concentrate resources on areas with high impact and relevance and reduce unnecessary duplication by significantly increasing the overall volume of publicly funded transnational research and innovation efforts (competitive and institutional funding) implemented in a coordinated way.
  • Produce substantial leverage effect of EU funding on national/regional public funding and private resources.
  • Ensure significant level of financial commitments to the joint calls and actions.
  • Establish an effective process to identify and select topics for intervention and establish flexible governance that allows effective steering and monitoring of the entire process.
  • Strengthen participation of all Member States to support them in linking their research and innovation capacities towards cross boarder cooperation.
  • Ensure high and common standards for proposal evaluation and selection for the calls launched by ERA-NETs and support harmonisation of funding rules and implementation modalities for the selected projects
  • Optimise the management and limit administrative costs for the implementation at EU level while simplifying participation of national/regional research funders.

 

Erasmus+

Erasmus+ is the EU Programme in the fields of education, training, youth and sport for the period 2014-2020. Education, training, youth and sport can make a major contribution to help tackle socio-economic changes, the key challenges that Europe will be facing until the end of the decade and to support the implementation of the Europe 2020 strategy for growth, jobs, social equity and inclusion.

Erasmus+ brings together all EU programmes in the fields of EducationTraining and Youth; it also provides support for Sport for the first time. As an integrated programme, Erasmus+ offers more opportunities for cooperation in these sectors and is easier to access than its predecessors, with simplified funding rules.

The target number is around 4 million people to get involved in mobility actions.


Objectives
The Erasmus+ Programme shall contribute to the achievement of:

  • the objectives of the Europe 2020 Strategy, including the headline education target;
  • the objectives of the strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training (ET 2020), including the corresponding benchmarks;
  • the sustainable development of Partner Countries in the field of higher education;
  • the overall objectives of the renewed framework for European cooperation in the youth field (2010-2018);
  • the objective of developing the European dimension in sport, in particular grassroots sport, in line with the EU work plan for sport;
  • the promotion of European values in accordance with Article 2 of the Treaty on European Union

ESPON Programme

ESPON offers substantial territorial evidence on a large number of relevant themes as well as useful tools supporting the necessary analyses positioning the programme area in the European context, its potentials and challenges. Managing Authorities are invited to make use of the available ESPON research results, analyses, data, indicators and tailor made tools that fits the ideas and visions for their Operational Programme for 2014-2020.

Objectives:

Four strategic avenues will guide the implementation of the ESPON 2013 Programme in 2014:

(1) Emphasising capitalisation and communication activities and wide-spread use of ESPON territorial evidence based on all results achieved with the ESPON 2013 Programme, with particular promotion of new evidence becoming available during 2014.

(2) Improving the ESPON toolbox through a wide-range of actions on different issues that together contributes to a consistent and inter-related set of tools for territorial analyses based on ESPON results.

(3) Guaranteeing high quality, solid and useful outputs from active projects, supported by clear executive summaries and applications that can make ESPON even more useful as provider of territorial evidence and tools.

(4) Continuing efforts ensuring sound financial management with finding-free audits and quality checks and preparing for the winding up of the 2013 Programme.

EU Civil Protection Mechanism and Emergency Response Coordination Centre (ERCC)

In the field of civil protection, the EU plays an 'enabling role' to support, coordinate or supplement the actions of Member States in the prevention of, preparedness for, and response to disasters. The primary responsibility for the protection of people, as well as the environment and property, including cultural heritage, lies with Member States.

Consequently, it is Member States who bear the financial costs of most civil protection actions, leaving the EU civil protection budget relatively small (compared to that for humanitarian aid). Whereas, the EU civil protection budget can only offer limited incentives, Structural Funds can support with more substantial funding.

The budget for the implementation of the EU Civil Protection Mechanism for 2014-2020 is €368.4 million of which €223.7 million shall be used for prevention, preparedness and response actions inside the EU and €144.6 million for actions outside the EU. These amounts are complemented by contributions from non-EU countries that participate in the EU Civil Protection Mechanism.

EU Programme for Peace and Reconciliation 2014-2020 (Peace IV)

The European Union, in recognition of the significant challenges that face Northern Ireland and the Border Region of Ireland, has made a specific allocation of funding within the new regulations 2014-2020 to address issues associated with the creation of a more peaceful society. Specifically the regulations have made provision for a budget of €229m for a new PEACE Programme under the European Regional Development Fund. The new PEACE Programme will provide support to projects that contribute towards the promotion of greater levels of peace and reconciliation. It will place a strong emphasis on promoting cross-community relations and understanding in order to create a more cohesive society. The Programme has four key priority areas, for more information on these areas click here.

Europe for Citizens

Europe for Citizens aims to promote active European citizenship with the main scope of bridging the gap between citizens and the European Union through financial instruments that promote active European citizenship. It intends to encourage cooperation between citizens and organisations from different countries and facilitate the development of a sense of belonging to common European ideals and to promote the process of European integration.


Objectives

The programme aims to address the need for more genuine debates on Union related issues at the local, regional and national levels, which can be translated into a pan-European perspective. It seeks to reach out to the large group of citizens – those who would normally not seek to influence or take part in Union affairs – through a broad set of organisations to take a first step towards involvement, whatever the (Union related) topic or format, as long as it is trans-national or has a European dimension.

The programme shall have the following specific objectives, which shall be implemented  through actions on a transnational level or with a clear European dimension: 
1. raise awareness on remembrance, the Union's history, identity and aim by stimulating debate, reflection and networking;  Progress will be measured against the number of beneficiaries reached directly and  indirectly, quality of projects, and percentage of first time applicants. 
2. encourage democratic and civic participation of citizens at Union level, by developing citizens' understanding of the Union policy making-process and promoting opportunities for societal engagement and volunteering at Union level. Progress will be measured against the number of beneficiaries reached directly and 
indirectly, the perception of the EU and its institutions by the beneficiaries, quality of projects, and percentage of first time applicants.

 

European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD)

Rural development contributes to the competitiveness of agriculture, the sustainable management of natural resources and climate action and the balanced territorial development of rural areas.
In line with the Europe 2020 strategy, these broad objectives of rural development support for 2014-2020 are given more detailed expression through the following six EU-wide priorities:

  • fostering knowledge transfer and innovation in agriculture, forestry and rural areas;
  • enhancing competitiveness of all types of agriculture and enhancing farm viability;
  • promoting food chain organization and risk management in agriculture;
  • restoring, preserving and enhancing ecosystems dependent on agriculture and forestry
  • promoting resource efficiency and supporting the shift towards a low-carbon and climate-resilient economy in the agriculture, food and forestry sectors;
  • promoting social inclusion, poverty reduction and economic development in rural areas.

European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF)

The European Globalisation Fund aims to help workers reintegrate into the labour market after they have been made redundant as a result of major structural changes in world trade patterns (e.g: as a consequence of the global financial and economic crisis). For example, it supported Belgian workers after the General Motors Antwerp plant closed-down.

The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) enables the Europan Union to demonstrate solidarity at Union level and to provide support to workers made redundant as a consequence of trade globalisation, as a result of an unexpected crisis or as a consequence of trade agreements impacting upon the agricultural sector.

The EGF is one of the special instruments not included in the MFF.
Objectives

  • Provide tailored made services to each worker and reintegrate dismissed workers into the labour market as soon as possible
  • Encourage a competitive but fair EU

The aim of the EGF is to contribute to economic growth and employment in the Union by enabling the Union to show solidarity towards workers made redundant as a result of major structural changes in world trade patterns due to globalisation, trade agreements affecting agriculture, or an unexpected crisis, and to provide financial support for their rapid reintegration into employment, or for changing or adjusting their agricultural activities. Actions benefiting from financial contributions by the Fund shall aim to ensure that a minimum of 50 % of workers participating in these actions find stable employment within a year from the date of application

 
 

European Innovation Partnerships - EIP*

The establishment of European Innovation Partnerships (EIPs) in different sectors represents a new approach under the Europe 2020 Strategy to advance EU research and innovation. EIPs are challenge-driven, focusing on societal benefits and rapid modernisation. EIPs should provide favourable conditions for research and innovation partners to co-operate and achieve better and faster results compared to existing approaches.
The agricultural European Innovation Partnership (EIP-AGRI), which was launched by a communication in February 2012 , aims to foster a competitive and sustainable agriculture and forestry sector. The agricultural European Innovation Partnership (EIP-AGRI) works to foster competitive and sustainable farming and forestry that 'achieves more and better from less'.  It contributes to ensuring a steady supply of food, feed and biomaterials, developing its work in harmony with the essential natural resources on which farming depends.

EIPs act across the whole research and innovation chain, bringing together all relevant actors at EU, national and regional levels in order to:

  • step up research and development efforts;
  • coordinate investments in demonstration and pilots;
  • anticipate and fast-track any necessary regulation and standards; and
  • mobilise ‘demand’

 


Objectives

EIPs streamline, simplify and better coordinate existing instruments and initiatives and complement them with new actions where necessary. This should make it easier for partners to co-operate and achieve better and faster results compared to what exists already. Therefore, they build upon relevant existing tools and actions and, where this makes sense, they integrate them into a single coherent policy framework. Flexibility is important; there is not a 'one-size-fits-all' framework.

Existing European Innovation Partnerships:

European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR)

The instrument for democracy and human rights supports the promotion, development and consolidation of democracy and the rule of law as well as the respect for human rights worldwide. Assistance under EIDHR complements other tools which are used to implement EU policies for democracy and human rights such as ENI, DCI and IfS.


It aims to contribute to an increased respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms and to promote democratic reforms in third countries through support to civil society organisations support. Furthermore to support and enhance the international framework for the protection, promotion and monitoring of human rights, the promotion of democracy and the rule of law and reinforce an active for civil society within these frameworks.

The EIDHR's scope has been updated on the issues of support to democracy, economic and social rights and freedom of thought. Its objectives have been better defined to protection of human rights and support of democratic processes. The instrument will have a stronger focus on the most difficult countries and urgency situations where human rights and fundamental freedoms are most endangered. In such situations, the Union will be able to respond in a flexible and timely manner through ad hoc grants. This will particularly be  the case where less speedy solutions would expose beneficiaries to the risk of serious intimidation or retaliation and in order to address urgent protection needs of human rights defenders on the ground. Concretely this means: informal partnerships can benefit from funds; re-granting within projects will be possible; grants for human rights defenders in urgent protection needs will be possible; direct award of grants can be used where calls for proposal are not possible (e.g. Belarus, Iran, China). Its implementation will be more flexible and will be fully untied which means that aid will not be labelled for certain countries in advance but be provided through open procedures, responding to needs.

 

 

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF)

The EMFF is the fund for the EU's maritime and fisheries policies for 2014-2020, which aims at:

  • Promoting competitive, environmentally sustainable, economically viable and socially responsible fisheries and aquaculture;
  • Fostering the implementation of the CFP;
  • Promoting a balanced and inclusive territorial development of fisheries and aquaculture areas;
  • Fostering the development and implementation of the Union’s IMP in a manner complementary to cohesion policy and to the CFP.

The EMFF is structured around 4 pillars:

  1. Smart, Green Fisheries (shared management) to foster the transition to sustainable fishing which is more selective, produces no discards, does less damage to marine ecosystems and thus contributes to the sustainable management of marine ecosystems; and to provide support focused on innovation and value added, making the fisheries sector economically viable and resilient to external shocks and to competition from third countries.
  2. Smart, Green Aquaculture (shared management) - to achieve economically viable, competitive and green aquaculture, capable of facing global competition and providing EU consumers with healthy and high nutrition value products.
  3. Sustainable and Inclusive Territorial Development (shared management) - to reverse the decline of many coastal and inland communities dependent on fishing, through adding more value to fishing and fishing related activities and through diversification to other sectors of the maritime economy.
  4. Integrated Maritime Policy (direct centralised management) to support those cross cutting priorities which generate savings and growth but which the Member States will not take forward on their own – such as marine knowledge, maritime spatial planning, integrated coastal zone management and integrated maritime surveillance, the protection of the marine environment, in particular its biodiversity, and adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change on coastal areas.


In addition to the four pillars, the EMFF will include accompanying measures: data collection and scientific advice, control, governance, fisheries markets (including outermost regions), voluntary payments to RFMOs and technical assistance.

European Metrology Research Programme for Innovation and Research (EMPIR)

EMPIR, the successor EMRP programme, will contribute to a number of flagship initiatives under EUROPE 2020 that are affected by metrology
research, including ‘Innovation Union’, ‘A digital agenda for Europe’, ‘Resource-efficient Europe’ and ‘An industrial policy for the globalisation era’. It will do this by developing innovative solutions for the management of natural resources, by supporting the standardisation process that enables global trade opportunities for new products and services and by allowing the efficient testing of communication satellites, for example. EMPIR will strongly contribute to achieving the objectives of Horizon 2020 by supporting topics ofdirect relevance for a number of Horizon 2020 priorities.

The proposed initiative EMPIR will be based on Article 185 of the TFEU. The conclusions of the interim evaluation and an analysis of the options in the impact assessment have demonstrated that Article 185 is the most a ppropriate means for achieving the objectives of EMPIR. The proposal will simplify the administrative procedures for public authorities and bodies(EU or national) and for private parties.
The EU will deal directly with the dedicated implementation structure of EMPIR, which will be in charge of allocating, monitoring and reporting on the use of the EU’s contribution

Objectives:

  • Provide integrated and fit-for-purpose metrology solutions supporting innovation and industrial competitiveness and measurement technologies to tackle societal challenges such as health, environment and energy including support to policy development and implementation;
  • Create an integrated European Metrology Research system with critical mass and active engagement at regional, national, European and international level

European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI)

EMPIR, the successor EMRP programme, will contribute to a number of flagship initiatives under EUROPE 2020 that are affected by metrology
research, including ‘Innovation Union’, ‘A digital agenda for Europe’, ‘Resource-efficient Europe’ and ‘An industrial policy for the globalisation era’. It will do this by developing innovative solutions for the management of natural resources, by supporting the standardisation process that enables global trade opportunities for new products and services and by allowing the efficient testing of communication satellites, for example. EMPIR will strongly contribute to achieving the objectives of Horizon 2020 by supporting topics ofdirect relevance for a number of Horizon 2020 priorities.

The proposed initiative EMPIR will be based on Article 185 of the TFEU. The conclusions of the interim evaluation and an analysis of the options in the impact assessment have demonstrated that Article 185 is the most a ppropriate means for achieving the objectives of EMPIR. The proposal will simplify the administrative procedures for public authorities and bodies(EU or national) and for private parties.
The EU will deal directly with the dedicated implementation structure of EMPIR, which will be in charge of allocating, monitoring and reporting on the use of the EU’s contribution

Objectives:

  • Provide integrated and fit-for-purpose metrology solutions supporting innovation and industrial competitiveness and measurement technologies to tackle societal challenges such as health, environment and energy including support to policy development and implementation;
  • Create an integrated European Metrology Research system with critical mass and active engagement at regional, national, European and international level

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)

The ERDF aims to strengthen economic and social cohesion in the European Union by correcting imbalances between its regions. The ERDF supports regional and local development by co-financing investments in R&D and innovation; climate change and environment; business support to SMEs; services of common economic interest; telecommunication, energy and transport infrastructures; health, education and social infrastructures; and sustainable urban development.


Objectives

The ERDF shall contribute to the financing of support which aims to reinforce economic, social and territorial cohesion by redressing the main regional imbalances through support for the development and structural adjustment of regional economies, including the conversion of declining industrial regions and regions lagging behind.

The ERDF should contribute to the Europe 2020 strategy, thus ensuring greater concentration of ERDF support on the priorities of the Union. According to the category of regions supported, the support from the ERDF should be concentrated on research and innovation, small and medium-sized enterprises and climate change mitigation. The degree of concentration should take into account the level of development of the region as well as the specific needs of regions whose GDP per capita for the 2007-13 period was less than 75% of the average GDP of the EU-25 for the reference period.

European Social Fund (ESF)

The European Social Fund (ESF) supports policies and priorities aiming to achieve progress towards full employment, enhance quality and productivity at work, increase the geographical and occupational mobility of workers within the Union, improve education and training systems, and promote social inclusion, thereby contributing to economic, social and territorial cohesion.


 

European Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps (EVHAC)

EU Aid Volunteers is an initiative which has been developed by the European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO) of the European Commission and is grounded on the Treaty of Lisbon.  Its overall aim is to provide international volunteer opportunities for Europeans to engage in humanitarian aid and civil protection activities around the world. The EU Aid Volunteers project is sponsoring several pilot projects which will contribute to laying the grounds for a community of European volunteers active in the field.

The European Commission set out its plans to develop a global initiative that will create opportunities for some 10,000 people from 2014-2020 to volunteer worldwide in humanitarian operations.

The Commission proposed to develop European standards for managing volunteers in humanitarian projects and a European training programme. Trained volunteers will be deployed as EU Aid Volunteers in humanitarian projects worldwide. A network of EU Aid Volunteers will be created, so they can interact with and support each other before, during and after deployment. Other people can also get involved through online volunteering supporting volunteers already in the field or helping humanitarian organisations with tasks that can be done from home on a computer.

Eurostars -2

Eurostars-2 is aligned with the Europe 2020 strategy, the related Flagship initiative ‘Innovation Union’and ‘A Reinforced European Research Area Partnership for Excellence and Growth’will aim at supporting research performing SMEs by co-financing their market oriented research projects in any field. As such, and in combination with the activities under the ‘Leading and Enabling Technology’ objectiveset out in the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, it will contribute tothe goals of the Industrial Leadership part of that programme to speed-up development of th e technologies and innovations that will underpin tomorrow’s businesses and help innovative European SMEs to grow into world-leading companies. As part of the improvements from the previous Eurostars programme, Eurostars-2 should head towards shorter time to grant, stronger integration and lean, transparent and more efficient administration to the ultimate benefit of research performing SMEs.

The Horizon 2020 Communication indicates that: ‘partnership approaches on the basis of Articles 185 and 187 of the Treaty will also be continued’. Article 20(2)(b) of the proposal for a Regulation establishing Horizon 2020 lists a number of criteria for how public-public partnerships are to be identified. Eurostars complies with those criteria: the ‘Budapest document’ on Eurostars-2 was endorsed by all Eureka countries.

In line with the recommendations from the interim evaluation of Eurostars-1, Eurostars-2 will be characterised by:

  • streamlined programme administration
  • stronger integration (standardised rules, 50 top ranking projects funded, etc)
  • shorter time to contract

Objectives:

  •  to promote market-oriented transnational research activities in any fields of research-performing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), especially those without previous experience in transnational research, leading to the placing of new or improved products, processes and services on the market;
  • to contribute to the completion of the European Research Area (ERA) and to increase the accessibility, efficiency and efficacy of public funding for research-performing SMEs in n Europe by aligning, harmonising and synchronising the national funding mechanisms

Eurostars-2 aims to:

  • promote research activities that comply with the following conditions:

(a) the activities are carried out by transnational collaboration of research-performing SMEs among themselves or including other actors of the innovation chain (e.g. universities, research organisations)
(b) results of activities are expected to be introduced into the market within two years of the completion of an activity increase the accessibility, efficiency and efficacy of public funding for SMEs in Europe by aligning, harmonising and synchronising the national funding mechanisms
of participating states

  •  promote the participation of SMEs without previous experience in transnational research

Food and Feed (Food Chain Funding)

Protecting the health of humans, animals and plants at every stage of the food production process is a key public health and economic priority for the European Union. In the last 10 years, the EU has spent € 3.3 billion on its food safety policy, including € 2.2 billion on specific programmes.

Continuing this approach, the main objective of the Regulation (EU) No 652/2014 (for Food chain, animal and plant health expenditures) is to contribute to a high level of health for humans, animals and plants, while protecting consumers and the environment, and creating one single, clear and modern financial framework for animal health, animal welfare, plant health and official controls.

Galileo

Galileo is supporting the implementation and operation of satellite navigation systems. Galileo and EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service) programmes are flagship projects of the Union. In the period 2014-2020 the programme will finance the completion of the deployment phase of the Galileo programme, the exploitation phase of the same programme and operation of the EGNOS system.


Objectives

The aim of the Galileo programme is to establish and operate the first global satellite navigation and positioning infrastructure specifically designed for civilian purposes. The aim of the EGNOS programme is to improve the quality of signals from existing global navigation satellite systems (GNSS).
 

 

Guarantee fund for External Actions

The Guarantee Fund for external Actions covers defaults on loans and loan guarantees granted to non-EU countries or for projects in non-EU countries.

Set up at a time when the guarantees on loans granted to non-Member countries were growing rapidly, the Fund was established:

  • to provide a "liquidity cushion" in order to avoid calling on the Community budget every time a default or late payment on a guaranteed loan arises; and
  • to create an instrument of budgetary discipline by laying down a financial framework for the development of Community policy on guarantees for Commission and EIB loans to non-Member countries.

The lending operations covered by the Fund relate to three different instruments, each of which benefits from a guarantee from the EU budget. These instruments are: European Investment Bank (EIB) lending, Euratom loans and Macro-Financial Assistance.

The Fund is provisioned from the general EU budget and has to be maintained at a certain percentage of the outstanding amount of the loans and loan guarantees covered by the Fund. This percentage, known as the target rate, is currently 9%

Health for Growth Programme

On 21 March 2014, the Third Health Programme was published in the Official Journal of the European Union and is available in all EU official languages.

The programme has 4 overarching objectives:

  • Promote health, prevent diseases and foster supportive environments for healthy lifestyles taking into account the 'health in all policies' principle
  • Protect Union citizens from serious cross-border health threats
  • Contribute to innovative, efficient and sustainable health systems
  • Facilitate access to better and safer healthcare for Union citizens

The Third EU Health Programme with a budget of € 449.4 million is the main European Commission instrument to implement the EU health strategy.

It is implemented by means of annual work plans which set out priority areas and the criteria for funding actions under the programme.

The Consumers, Health, Agriculture and Food Executive Agency (Chafea) is entrusted by the European Commission to implement the Health Programme. This is mainly done through financing three types of different actions: projects, joint actions and operation grants. Those actions should have a special European dimension, meaning that a minimum of various partners of different European Countries have to be involved in the project plan.

Since 2014, the Call for Proposals under the Third Health Programme are being published in parallel at the webpages of Chafea as well as in the EU Research & Innovation Participant Portal. The electronic submission and grant management system of the EU Research & Innovation Participant Portal is furthermore used for the evaluation of proposals, the preparation and monitoring of grant agreements as well as for the technical and financial reporting. Therewith, Chafea ensures a complete electronic lifecycle for grants. The evaluation of proposals is done by external experts in the respective topic fields. Experts are invited to register for this tasks.

Proposals must respond to the priorities identified in the annual work programmes, implementing the Health Programme.

Furthermore the applicant must have to be legally established in:

  • one of the 28 EU member states
  • an EFTA country party to European Economic Area (Iceland, or Norway)

Organisations from other countries can only participate as subcontractors or collaborating stakeholders.

Please note: Financial support is not available for individuals. Only legally established organisations are able to apply (such as non-governmental organisations, public sector bodies, public administrations, universities, higher education establishments etc.). More information will be available in the call for proposals documents, once the calls are launched.

There are 4 additional principles which you have to know if you want to apply:

Co-financing rule: you need to have your own financial resources (or financial resources of third parties). The Chafea will subsidize between 60 or 80 percent of the eligible costs.
Non-profit rule: the grant may not have the purpose or effect of producing a profit
Non-retroactivity rule: you can get co-funding only for the costs incurred after the starting date
Non-cumulate rule: each action may give rise to the award of only one grant to any one beneficiary

Hercule III

The Hercule III programme was established to promote increased transnational cooperation in activities against fraud, corruption and any other illegal activities affecting the financial interests of the Union. It does so by offering joint specialised training for staff of national, regional administrations and to other stakeholders. Among others, Hercule III helps national law enforcement authorities in their fight against illegal cross-border activities by financing technical and operational support and professional training activities.

 

Objectives

The operational objectives of the programme are:

  • Improving the prevention and investigation of fraud, smuggling and counterfeiting, especially of cigarettes, by enhancing transnational and multi-disciplinary cooperation;
  • Increasing the protection of the financial interests of the EU against fraud by facilitating the exchange of information, experiences and best practices, including staff exchanges;
  • Strengthening the fight against fraud and other illegal activities by providing technical and operational support to national investigations, and in particular to customs and law enforcement authorities;
  • Limiting the currently known exposure of the financial interests of the Union to fraud, corruption and other illegal activities;
  • Enhancing the development of legal and judicial protection of the financial interests against fraud by promoting a comparative legal analysis.

Horizon 2020

Horizon 2020 is the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly €80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014 to 2020) – in addition to the private investment that this money will attract. It promises more breakthroughs, discoveries and world-firsts by taking great ideas from the lab to the market.

Horizon 2020 is the financial instrument implementing the Innovation Union, a Europe 2020 flagship initiative aimed at securing Europe's global competitiveness.

Seen as a means to drive economic growth and create jobs, Horizon 2020 has the political backing of Europe’s leaders and the Members of the European Parliament. They agreed that research is an investment in our future and so put it at the heart of the EU’s blueprint for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth and jobs.

By coupling research and innovation, Horizon 2020 is helping to achieve this with its emphasis on excellent science, industrial leadership and tackling societal challenges. The goal is to ensure Europe produces world-class science, removes barriers to innovation and makes it easier for the public and private sectors to work together in delivering innovation.

Horizon 2020 is open to everyone, with a simple structure that reduces red tape and time so participants can focus on what is really important. This approach makes sure new projects get off the ground quickly – and achieve results faster.

The EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation will be complemented by further measures to complete and further develop the European Research Area. These measures will aim at breaking down barriers to create a genuine single market for knowledge, research and innovation.

Humanitarian Aid

The Community's humanitarian aid comprises assistance, relief and protection operations on a non-discriminatory basis to help people in third countries, particularly the most vulnerable among them, and as a priority those in developing countries, victims of natural disasters, man-made crises, such as wars and outbreaks of fighting, or exceptional situations or circumstances comparable to natural or man-made disasters. Such aid also comprises operations to prepare for risks or prevent disasters or comparable exceptional circumstances.

 

Objectives

The Humanitarian Aid Instrument will provide response to natural and man-made disasters, based on the international principles of humanitarian law, and through the use of specialised organisations.

  • To save and preserve life during emergencies and their immediate aftermath and natural disasters that have entailed major loss of life, physical, psychological or social suffering or material damage;
  • To provide the necessary assistance and relief to people affected by longer-lasting crises arising, in particular, from outbreaks of fighting or wars, producing the same effects as those described in subparagraph (a), especially where their own governments prove unable to help or there is a vacuum of power;
  • To help finance the transport of aid and efforts to ensure that it is accessible to those for whom it is intended, by all logistical means available, and by protecting humanitarian goods and personnel, but excluding operations with defence implications;
  • To carry out short-term rehabilitation and reconstruction work, especially on infrastructure and equipment, in close association with local structures, with a view to facilitating the arrival of relief, preventing the impact of the crisis from worsening and starting to help those affected regain a minimum level of self-sufficiency, taking long-term development objectives into account where possible;
  • To cope with the consequences of population movements (refugees, displaced people and returnees) caused by natural and man-made disasters and carry out schemes to assist repatriation to the country of origin and resettlement there when the conditions laid down in current international agreements are in place;
  • To ensure preparedness for risks of natural disasters or comparable exceptional circumstances and use a suitable rapid early-warning and intervention system;
  • To support civil operations to protect the victims of fighting or comparable emergencies, in accordance with current international agreements.

Instrument Contributing to Stability and Peace (ICSP)

The Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP) is one of the key external assistance instruments that enable the EU to take a lead in helping to prevent and respond to actual or emerging crises around the world. The FPI, working in close collaboration with other services of the European Commission and the European External Action Service (EEAS), mobilises the IcSP to provide for:

  • Urgent short-term actions in response to situations of crisis or emerging crisis, often complementing EU humanitarian assistance; and
  •  Longer-term capacity building of organisations engaged in crisis response and peace-building.

The IcSP aims to address global and regional trans-border challenges with a security or stability dimension arising in third countries, including issues such as nuclear safety, as well as the fight against trafficking, organised crime and terrorism and unforeseen major threats to public health In addition, some of the most critical security challenges have a worldwide scope, impacting on both developing and industrialized countries. Natural and man-made disasters, cyber security challenges and threats and related disruptions increase insecurity, hamper development, weaken the rule of law and contribute to instability. It also aims to enable the Community to deliver a timely response to future urgent policy challenges faced by the Union, by piloting measures unforeseen under the three policy-driven instruments, until such time as they can adequately be integrated within the policy framework of those instruments

 

Objectives

The specific objectives shall be:

  • In a situation of crisis or emerging crisis, to swiftly contribute to stability by providing an effective response designed to help preserve, establish or re-establish the conditions essential to the proper implementation of the Union's external policies and actions in accordance with Article 21 TEU ;
  • To contribute to the prevention of conflicts and to ensuring capacity and preparedness to address pre- and post-crisis situations and build peace; to address specific global and trans-regional threats to peace, international security and stability
  • To address specific global and trans-regional threats to peace, international security and stability.

Instrument for Nuclear Safety Cooperation (INSC)

Due to global challenges and the need for the EU to take action in this field, the EU supports the promotion of a high level of nuclear safety, radiation protection, and the application of efficient and effective safeguards of nuclear material in third countries. The geographical scope of the Instrument for Nuclear Safety Cooperation (INSC) extends to all third countries, but priority is given to accession and neighbouring countries.

Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II)

Prepared in partnership with the beneficiaries, IPA II sets a new framework for providing pre-accession assistance for the period 2014-2020.

The most important novelty of IPA II is its strategic focus. Country Strategy Papers are the specific strategic planning documents made for each beneficiary for the 7-year period. These will provide for a stronger ownership by the beneficiaries through integrating their own reform and development agendas. A Multi-Country Strategy Paper will address priorities for regional cooperation or territorial cooperation.

IPA II targets reforms within the framework of pre-defined sectors. These sectors cover areas closely linked to the enlargement strategy, such as democracy and governance, rule of law or growth and competitiveness. This sector approach promotes structural reform that will help transform a given sector and bring it up to EU standards. It allows a move towards a more targeted assistance, ensuring efficiency, sustainability and focus on results.

IPA II also allows for a more systematic use of sector budget support. Finally, it gives more weight to performance measurement: indicators agreed with the beneficiaries will help assess to what extent the expected results have been achieved.

Internal Security Fund

To promote the implementation of the Internal Security Strategy, law enforcement cooperation and the management of the Union's external borders, the Internal Security Fund (ISF) has been set up for the period 2014-20 and its total budget amounts to approximately EUR 3.8 billion. The Fund will ensure that EU States are provided with adequate Union financial support to ensure progress towards the policy objectives and to address important challenges in the area of internal security. The ISF is composed of two instruments:

1. Borders and Visa (ISF Borders and Visa)

2. Police cooperation, preventing and combatting crime, and crisis management (ISF Police)

Activities which will be implemented through the ISF Borders and Visa instrument were formerly supported by the External Borders Fund (EBF) and the ISF Police instrument will cover activities which were supported by the specific programmes Prevention of and Fight against Crime (ISEC) and Prevention, Preparedness and Consequence Management of Terrorism and other Security-related Risks (CIPS) in the 2007-13 period.

INTERREG EUROPE

The interregional cooperation programme  -  INTERREG EUROPE - Innovation and Environment Regions of Europe Sharing Solutions

The interregional cooperation programme 2014-2020,  ‘INTERREG EUROPE’, is currently being shaped. Its objective is to help European regions to design and implement regional policies and programmes more effectively, in particular the EU Structural and Investment Funds programmes for Growth and Jobs, but also, where relevant, the programmes under th eEuropean Territorial Cooperation (ETC) goal. The programme aims to do so through enabling exchange of experience, knowledge and good practices among relevant stakeholders from different European regions. The programme is co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) 

Joint Programming Initiatives*

The overall aim of the Joint Programming process is to pool national research efforts in order to make better use of Europe's precious public R&D resources and to tackle common European challenges more effectively in a few key areas.

Horizon 2020 will support Joint Programming Initiatives when they are in line with the agenda.


Objectives

It is a structured and strategic process whereby Member States agree, on a voluntary basis and in a partnership approach, on common visions and Strategic Research Agendas (SRA) to address major societal challenges. On a variable geometry basis, Member States commit to Joint Programming Initiatives (JPIs) where they implement together joint Strategic Research Agendas

Joint Technology Initiatives*

Joint Technology Initiatives (JTIs) are means to implement the Strategic Research Agendas (SRAs) of a limited number of European Technology Platforms (ETPs).In these few ETPs, the scale and scope of the objectives is such that loose co-ordination through ETPs and support through the regular instruments of the Framework Programme for Research and Development are not sufficient. Instead, effective implementation requires a dedicated mechanism that enables the necessary leadership and coordination to achieve the research objectives. To meet the needs of this small number of ETPs, the concept of "Joint Technology Initiatives" has been developed

The operational and support expenditure for each of the JTIs and SESAR in 2014 (in commitment and payment appropriations) are proposed to be funded by redeployment from the major operational budget lines of the Horizon 2020 programmes concerned, which serve the same policy objectives. Overall, the redeployment of commitment and payment appropriations within Horizon 2020 to allow the functioning of the five JTIs and SESAR amounts to EUR 609,2 million in commitment appropriations and EUR 76,9 million in payment appropriations.The financial envelopes for the JTIs and SESAR indicated above consist primarily of operational appropriations to realise their policy objectives, as well as of a contribution to their running costs, which are financed on a 50/50 basis with industry and other partners in the joint undertaking. The overall amount of operational expenditure to be managed by the JTIs and SESAR is foreseen to increase substantially over the new MFF period.

The Horizon 2020 Regulation sets out a number of criteria which must be met when selecting areas for public-private partnerships. The legislation also foresees a single set of rules that will apply to all parts of Horizon 2020, including the JTIs, unless there is a well justified need for a specific derogation.

Building on the experience gained with Joint Technology Initiatives (JTIs) during the current 7th Research Framework Programme (FP7), and the clear commitments from the industry partners, JTIs under Horizon 2020 will benefit from a legal framework that is better suited to strong industrial involvement and major simplification achieved by making full use of the new provisions in the Financial Regulation, which includes dedicated provisions on public-private partnerships, e.g.10 explicit recognition of JTIs as public-private partnership bodies with the possibility to adopt their own 'light' Financial Regulation adapted to their specific needs.

Objectives

JTIs support co-operative research across Europe in fields of key importance for industrial research, where there are clearly identified common technological and economic objectives. The idea is to boost European investment by providing a clear framework for research investment, which encourages both industry and Member States to increase their spending.

They contribute considerably to raising European, national and regional as well as private R&D investment in the technological fields concerned and to improving the impact of this investment through concentrating efforts and resources and avoiding fragmentation.

Europe stands to gain massively from a focused approach to research which complements and integrates national research efforts, and leads to economies of scale and efficiency gains. Streamlining management overheads and reducing red tape would lead to shorter times to contract and project. This is attractive for companies that face ever-shrinking times to market and windows of opportunity.

Justice Programme

This programme shall contribute to the further development of a European area of justice based on mutual recognition and mutual trust. It promotes:


1. judicial cooperation in civil matters, including civil and commercial matters, insolvencies, family matters and successions, etc.

2. judicial cooperation in criminal mattersjudicial training, including language training on legal terminology, with a view to fostering a common legal and judicial culture

3. effective access to justice in Europe, including rights of victims of crime and procedural rights in criminal proceedings

4. initiatives in the field of drugs policy (judicial cooperation and crime prevention aspects)

 

Knowledge Innovation Communities (EIT KIC)*

The European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), based in Budapest, Hungary, aims to enhance Europe’s ability to innovate, which translates into providing solutions to the rapidly emerging societal problems, as well as products that meet the demands and desires of consumers.

 

Objectives

KICs carry out a whole range of activities, covering the entire innovation chain – including training and education programmes, reinforcing the journey from research to the market, innovation projects and business incubators.

Each KIC has been set up as a legal entity and has appointed a CEO to run its operations – a first for an EU initiative. The EIT has provided the KICs with a great degree of autonomy to define their legal status, internal organisation and working methods.

LIFE: Environmental and Climate Action

The new LIFE Programme with two subprogrammes: one for Environment and one for Climate Action. The creation of a subprogramme for Climate Action upgrades the former thematic strand "climate change" under the LIFE+ Environment Policy and Governance component.
LIFE Programme is a catalyst for promoting implementation and integration of environmental and climate objectives in other policies and Member State practice.

  • To contribute to the shift towards a resource-efficient, low-carbon and climateresilient economy, to the protection and improvement of the quality of the environment and to halting and reversing biodiversity loss;
  • To improve the development, implementation and enforcement of Union environmental and climate policy and legislation, and to catalyse and promote integration and mainstreaming of environmental and climate objectives into other Union policies and public and private sector practice, including by increasing their capacity;
  • To support better environmental and climate governance at all levels.

Macro-Financial Assistance to non-EU Countries

As a rule, MFA funds are paid to beneficiary countries' central banks and in general can be used however the government sees fit, be it for reserves, foreign exchange market intervention or as direct budget support. Unlike other forms of financial aid with macroeconomic objectives from the European Commission, such as the Instrument for Pre-accession, the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument, or the European Development Fund, MFA is an emergency assistance measure that is not meant to provide  regular financial support for economic and social development

Partnership Instrument for Cooperation with Third Countries (PI)

The Partnership Instrument is the main innovative instrument in the external action package. It supports measures that respond in an effective and flexible manner to objectives arising from the Union's bilateral, regional or multilateral relationships with third countries and shall address challenges of global concern and ensure an adequate follow-up to decision taken at a multilateral level.

 

Objectives

  • Implementing the international dimension of the “Europe 2020” strategy by supporting EU bilateral, regional and inter-regional cooperation partnership strategies, by promoting policy dialogues and by developing collective approaches and responses to challenges of global concern such as energy security, climate change and environment;
  • Improving market access and developing trade, investment and business opportunities for European companies, in particular SMEs, by means of economic partnerships and business and regulatory cooperation;
  • Enhancing widespread understanding and visibility of the Union and its role on the world scene by means of public diplomacy, education/academic cooperation and outreach activities to promote Union’s values and interests.

Pericles 2020

The Pericles programme is an exchange, assistance and training programme for the protection of the euro against counterfeiting. It is administered by OLAF.
The Pericles 2020 programme aims at combating euro-counterfeiting in Europe and worldwide. It funds exchanges, assistances and training for authorities, banks and others involved in the protection of euro coins and banknotes.
With the overall aim to protect the euro against counterfeiting, Pericles works to raise awareness and to act as a catalyst for closer cooperation between relevant structures and staff. It also seeks improving the general understanding of relevant European and international laws and instruments.

The Pericles programme is an exchange, assistance and training programme for the protection of the euro against counterfeiting. It is administered by OLAF.
The Pericles 2020 programme aims at combating euro-counterfeiting in Europe and worldwide. It funds exchanges, assistances and training for authorities, banks and others involved in the protection of euro coins and banknotes.
With the overall aim to protect the euro against counterfeiting, Pericles works to raise awareness and to act as a catalyst for closer cooperation between relevant structures and staff. It also seeks improving the general understanding of relevant European and international laws and instruments.



Objectives

The specific objective of the Programme shall be to protect the euro banknotes and coins against counterfeiting and related fraud, by supporting and supplement the measures undertaken by the Member States and assisting the competent national and European authorities in their efforts to develop between themselves and with the European Commission a close and regular cooperation, also including third countries and international organisations.
This objective shall be measured, inter alia, through the effectiveness of action by financial, technical, law-enforcement and judicial authorities, as measured through the number of counterfeits detected, illegal workshops dismantled, individuals arrested and sanctions imposed.

The short-term objectives of the Programme shall encompass:

  • raising awareness of the Union and international dimension of the euro; expanding general knowledge related to the protection of the euro;
  • supporting the prevention and contributing to repression of euro counterfeiting and related fraud through specialised training and assistance in these areas;
  • promoting convergence of high-level training activities for trainers, taking into consideration national operational strategies;
  • encouraging closer cooperation between the structures and staff concerned, developing mutual trust and exchanging information, inter alia of methods of action, experience and work practices;
  • supporting the development of specific legal and judicial protection of the euro;
  • increasing the level of protection of the euro in those countries that have been evaluated as being at risk by supporting the purchase of specific equipments.

 

Rights Equality and Citizenship Programme

The Rights and Citizenship Programme is the successor of three 2007-2013 programmes: Fundamental Rights and Citizenship, Daphne III, the Sections "Antidiscrimination and Diversity" and "Gender Equality" of the Programme for Employment and Social Solidarity (PROGRESS).

 

The general objective is to contribute to the creation of an area, where the rights of persons, as enshrined in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, are promoted and protected. In particular, this Programme should promote the rights deriving from European citizenship, the principles of non-discrimination and equality between women and men, the right to the protection of personal data, the rights of the child, the rights deriving from the Union consumer legislation and from the freedom to conduct a business in the internal market.


Objectives

  • To contribute to enhancing the exercise of rights deriving from the citizenship of the Union;
  • To promote the effective implementation of the principles of non discrimination on the grounds of sex, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation, including equality between women and men and the rights of persons with disabilities and of the elderly;
  • To contribute to ensuring a high level of protection of personal data;
  • To enhance the respect of the rights of the child;
  • To empower consumers and businesses to trade and purchase in trust within the internal market by enforcing the rights deriving from the Union consumer legislation and by supporting the freedom to conduct business in the internal market through cross-border transactions.

The general objective is to contribute to the creation of an area, where the rights of persons, as enshrined in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, are promoted and protected. In particular, this Programme should promote the rights deriving from European citizenship, the principles of non-discrimination and equality between women and men, the right to the protection of personal data, the rights of the child, the rights deriving from the Union consumer legislation and from the freedom to conduct a business in the internal market.

 

  • To contribute to enhancing the exercise of rights deriving from the citizenship of the Union;
  • To promote the effective implementation of the principles of non discrimination on the grounds of sex, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation, including equality between women and men and the rights of persons with disabilities and of the elderly;
  • To contribute to ensuring a high level of protection of personal data;
  • To enhance the respect of the rights of the child;
  • To empower consumers and businesses to trade and purchase in trust within the internal market by enforcing the rights deriving from the Union consumer legislation and by supporting the freedom to conduct business in the internal market through cross-border transactions.

Structural Funds

The Structural Funds (ERDF, ESF, CF, EAFRD and EMFF) are the main financial instruments to implement the European Union's regional and cohesion policy. 

From 2014, these operate under a common framework and pursue complementary policy objectives. They are the main source of investment at EU level to help Member States to restore and increase growth and ensure a job rich recovery while ensuring sustainable development, in line with the Europe 2020 objectives.

In its proposals for the 2014-2020 financial framework (tabled in June 2011) the European Commission:

  • decided that cohesion policy, rural development and maritime and fisheries policies should remain essential elements of the 2014-20 financial package because of their pivotal role in delivering the Europe 2020 strategy
  • proposed that structural policies should concentrate funding on a smaller number of priorities strongly linked to the Europe 2020 strategy.

TAIEX - Technical Assistance and Information Exchange

TAIEX - Technical Assistance and Information Exchange

TAIEX is the Technical Assistance and Information Exchange instrument managed by the Directorate-General Enlargement of the European Commission. TAIEX supports partner countries with regard to the approximation, application and enforcement of EU legislation. It is largely demand driven and facilitates the delivery of appropriate tailor-made expertise to address issues at short notice.

TAIEX’ main tasks are:

  • To provide short term technical assistance and advice on the transposition of EU legislation into the national legislation of beneficiary countries and on the subsequent administration, implementation and enforcement of such legislation.
  • To bring ENPI partner countries closer to the European Union, through increased economic integration and a deepening of political cooperation by sharing the experience gained during the enlargement process.
  • To provide technical training and peer assistance to partners and stakeholders of the beneficiary countries.
  • To be an information broker by gathering and making available information.
  • To provide database tools for facilitating and monitoring the approximation progress as well as to identify further technical assistance needs.
  • Technical assistance through the TAIEX instrument comes in many different forms and across a wide range of areas. Partner administrations can benefit from TAIEX’s flexibility to help meet wider training needs in EU legislation by reaching a significant number of officials. At the same time, it is important to retain an awareness of and be responsive to more targeted requests. In this regard, the expert and study visit format, depending entirely on requests received from beneficiary partners, provides a complementary institution building service.
  • As with other TAIEX training formats, experts and study visits are designed to provide short term assistance to beneficiary countries on the approximation and implementation of EU legislation. Study visits are visits made by a limited number of officials of the beneficiary countries to Member State administrations. They give an opportunity to the beneficiaries to work alongside Member State officials to discuss legislation, experience first-hand administrative procedures and infrastructure and see examples of best practices.
  • Expert missions on the other hand involve usually one or two Member State experts travelling to beneficiary partner countries. They provide an opportunity to discuss draft legislation, present examples of best practices and lend assistance where requested. The preferred format is working sessions involving an exchange of knowledge between the beneficiary countries and the experts.

Territorial Cooperation

European Territorial Cooperation provides resources for cooperation activities at the external borders of the Union, to be supported under the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument and the instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance. Synergies and complementarity between programmes under the European Territorial Cooperation goal and programmes financed under external instruments shall be promoted.
 


 

TWINNING

Twinning is an instrument for the cooperation between Public Administrations of EU Member States (MS) and of beneficiary countries. Beneficiaries include candidate countries and potential candidates to EU membership, as well as countries covered by the European Neighbourhood Policy.

More specifically, in the IPA region, Twinning aims to provide support for the transposition, implementation and enforcement of the EU legislation (the acquis).

It also strives to share good practices developed within the EU with beneficiary public administrations and to foster long-term relationships between administrations of existing and future EU countries.

URBACT III Programme

For more than ten years, the URBACT programme has been the European Territorial Cooperation programme aiming to foster sustainable integrated urban development in cities across Europe. It is an instrument of the Cohesion Policy, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund, the 28 Member States, Norway & Switzerland.

URBACT’s mission is to enable cities to work together and develop integrated solutions to common urban challenges, by networking, learning from one another’s experiences, drawing lessons and identifying good practices to improve urban policies.
 

Following the success of the URBACT I and II programmes, URBACT III (2014-2020) has been developed to continue to promote sustainable integrated urban development and contribute to the delivery of the Europe 2020 strategy.

URBACT III programme will be organised around four main objectives:

  1. Capacity for Policy Delivery: To improve the capacity of cities to manage sustainable urban policies and practices in an integrated and participative way.
  2. Policy Design: To improve the design of sustainable urban policies and practices in cities.
  3. Policy Implementation: To improve the implementation of integrated and sustainable urban strategies and actions in cities.
  4. Building and Sharing Knowledge: To ensure that practitioners and decision makers at all levels have access to knowledge and share know-how on all aspects of sustainable urban development in order to improve urban development policies.

To reach these objectives, URBACT III will develop three types of interventions:

  • transnational exchange,
  • capacity-building,
  • capitalisation & dissemination.

Each of these interventions will be build upon the strengths developed in URBACT II.

URBACT uses resources and know-how to strengthen the capacity of cities to deliver integrated urban strategy and actions on the thematic according to their challenges. The main target participants include practitioners, city managers, elected representatives and stakeholders from other public agencies, the private sector and civil society.

Youth Employment Initiative

The European Council has decided to create a Youth Employment Initiative to add to and reinforce the very considerable support already provided through the EU structural funds. The Initiative will be open to all regions (NUTS level 2) with levels of youth unemployment above 25%.

It will act in support of measures set out in the youth employment package proposed by the Commission in December 2012 and in particular to support the Youth Guarantee following its adoption.

The initiative focuses on integrating these young people into the labour market. Of the funding, €3 billion come from a dedicated Youth Employment budget line complemented by €3 billion more from the European Social Fund.
Objectives
 

YEI shall target all young persons under the age of 25 not in employment, education or training, residing in eligible regions, who are inactive or unemployed including the long-term unemployed, and whether or not registered as seeking work. On a voluntary basis, Member States may decide to extend the target group to include young persons under the age of 30.
For the purpose of the YEI for 2014-2015, "eligible regions" are those NUTS level 2 regions that have youth unemployment rates for young persons aged 15 to 24 of more than 25% in 2012 and,for Member States where the youth unemployment rate has increased by more than 30% in 2012, NUTS level 2 regions that have youth unemployment rates of more than 20% in 2012